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Faustus: That Damned Woman hero image
Faustus: That Damned Woman hero image
Faustus: That Damned Woman hero image

    Faustus: That Damned Woman tickets

    Continuing a season that sees A Doll’s House transported to colonial India and a striking translation of Antigone by Seamus Heaney, the Lyric Hammersmith welcomes playwright Chris Bush as she upends the Faust myth in Faustus: That Damned Woman next year.

    Taking the threads of the epic German legend about a man who sells his soul to the Devil, Faustus: That Damned Woman sees the iconic tragic figure reimagined as a woman. With a chance to change the course of history at risk, Johanna Faustus is willing to make the ultimate sacrifice – but what is the cost, and what legacy will she leave behind?

    Jodie McNee stars as Johanna Faustus, having previously appeared in Anatomy Of A Suicide at the Royal Court Theatre and Hamlet at Manchester Royal Exchange. She is joined by Act For Change founder Danny Lee Wynter (The Maids) as Mephistopheles.

    Faustus: That Damned Woman is written by award-winning playwright Chris Bush, who received rave reviews for her Sheffield-set musical Standing at the Sky’s Edge at the Crucible Theatre. A political and bold writer, her work includes Steel, The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and Tony! The Blair Musical.

    A co-production between the Lyric Hammersmith, Headlong Theatre Company and Birmingham Repertory Theatre, the play is directed by Caroline Byrne (Shakespeare’s Globe: All’s Well That Ends Well; The Taming of the Shrew), with set design from Ana Inés Jabares-Pita, costumes by Line Bech and lighting design by Richard Howell.

    Experience this bold and brilliant upending of a well-versed story before it heads out on tour. Faustus: That Damned Woman premieres at the Lyric Hammersmith from 23 January 2020.

    Performance dates: 21 Feb 2020 - 22 Feb 2020

    Running time: 2 hours 30 minutes (including interval)

    Age recommendation: Recommended 12+

    Special notice: Fans of the Lyric Hammersmith’s output of exciting new writing will want to secure tickets for Faustus: That Damned Woman, which offers a thoughtful and daring new look at a story we all think we know.

    Best Seats

    Faustus: That Damned Woman seat view photos show what view you will get for your money. Unfortunately we do not have any seat views for this show.

    Latest audience reviews

    Quite a spooky set. Because, of course, this is a take on the story of Faust, the doctor who sold his... More

    u2fancat Top 200 reviewer08 Feb 2020

    Quite a spooky set. Because, of course, this is a take on the story of Faust, the doctor who sold his soul to the devil. Like the original play, it starts in Elizabethan times, and Faust - in return for signing away his (her) soul in blood - gets some time, and the use of the demon Mephistopheles in the interim. At the end of the timespan, Faust's soul is forfeit. Unlike the original, this Faust is a woman, not allowed to be a doctor as the original is (initially, at least) and bargains a much better deal, getting a huge lifespan - and also the ability to zip forward to live in future times. Both, however, do end up feeling that they've frittered away the time allotted to them. There's a lot to like, here. I adored Mephistopheles, who appears as a fashion-conscious demon - indeed, they have great fun with the demons' costumes, which are an imaginative mish-mash of fashions and ideas, and all in shades of white (referring to Lucifer's identity as a bringer of light). And he does go around with a rather endearing smirk, most of the time. And I have to give kudos to the actor playing Faustus, who throws herself into the performance, and is onstage almost all the time, generally wrestling with inner demons. Lots of angst, lots of shouting.. it's a strenuous performance, I bet. The treatment of the story is also interesting, taking us through sundry time periods, mainly designed to give us a potted history of women's progress in science. So, you know, Faustus meets pioneering female scientists, and finds herself inspired to study. With an insatiable frenzy, she seems to absorb every fragment of information, and ends up trying to work for the good of humanity with the benefit of her vast knowledge - oh yes, and she doesn't age either. But.. what's going to happen to her in the end? and to her legacy..? Absorbing, unpredictable, with impressively scary bits - I liked it a lot.

    u2fancat Top 200 reviewer08 Feb 2020
    Tash11e 31 Aug 2021

    This was a very different take on the Faustus story having the lead character portrayed by a woman.... More

    joc78 Top 10 reviewer24 Feb 2020

    This was a very different take on the Faustus story having the lead character portrayed by a woman. It worked well as the acting was excellent and Jodie McNee really captured the character of Faustus and put her heart and soul into the performance. My only criticism was that there was a lot of shouting going on. That could be because I was so close to the stage but I didn't feel that much screaming at each other really added anything to the production!

    joc78 Top 10 reviewer24 Feb 2020

    Amazing reimagining of Faustus, intelligent script and a dazzling performance by the main character.... More

    dianea10 20 Feb 2020

    Amazing reimagining of Faustus, intelligent script and a dazzling performance by the main character. I would strongly recommend it.

    dianea10 20 Feb 2020
    jbrown15 Top 100 reviewer06 Feb 2020

    The show was very engaging and the acting very good. However I felt that in the second half something... More

    laurag24 11 Feb 2020

    The show was very engaging and the acting very good. However I felt that in the second half something was missing. Brilliant cast of actors.

    laurag24 11 Feb 2020
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