Cort Theatre Orchestra

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Orchestra guide

The Orchestra makes up around 502 seats at stage level in the Cort Theatre. It splits into three sections – Left, Right and Center - with aisles between, and extends back 17 rows. It is the most expensive overall area to sit, with premium seats close to the front. There are generally good views across the board, although for some theatergoers the front couple of rows may feel a bit too close to the stage. Sitting just slightly further back is a good bet in this small auditorium, where even the furthest rows don’t feel far removed from the performance.

There are some minor obstructions to sightlines, including angled seats at the far sides, the Mezzanine overhang cutting into the top of the stage after row O, and the rake being a bit shallow in the back rows. Legroom can also be a little bit lacking, with the best options for extra space on any aisle seat. However, on the whole the Cort Theatre’s Orchestra is much better than average.

The Orchestra has seven wheelchair designated spaces, and five aisle transfer seats. The entire section is step-free for all patrons.

Left Orchestra

The Left Orchestra has 16 rows from BB to P, with odd-numbered seats in the range of 1 to 23. The front few rows are shorter than this, however. Views are best from single-digit seats between rows A and D. From here, theatergoers aren’t too close to the stage, but can make the most of subtle details. Double-digit seats above 15 sit at an angle to the stage, which is more evident in the front rows. Further back, sightlines are generally clear and the stage doesn’t feel distant, although shorter patrons may find the rake a little too shallow. Prices are higher in the more desirable inside seats and become cheaper towards the far side and back.

Right Orchestra

The Right Orchestra comprises 16 rows from BB to P, with even-numbered seats escalating from 2 to 24 at their longest. The best seats are those towards the inside of rows A to D, which offer more head-on and comfortably detailed views of the performance. Like the Left Orchestra, double-digit seats above 16 are slightly more angled, with stage left (your right) partially obstructed. In the back rows, sightlines remain very good but the rake may cause issues if a taller person sits in front. However, on the whole the Right Orchestra has decent views, with legroom best on the aisles. Prices are highest at the front and inside of the section.

Center Orchestra

The Center Orchestra faces directly towards the stage, with an excellent overview of the whole set. Taller patrons wanting to stretch their legs can benefit from a seat on either aisle, therefore. There are 17 rows from AA to P, with seats numbering 101 to 112, left to right. The front two rows, AA and BB, may be too close for some theatergoers, whilst rows A to D offer an ideal position which combines comfort with proximity. From front to back, no seat is far away, although the rake is a bit shallow in the back rows and the Mezzanine overhang cuts into the top of the stage from row O. Premium seats are in the front rows, with prices falling towards the back of the section.

SeatPlan’s best views of the stage

Rows A to D in the Center Orchestra are perfect for a close view of performances. These seats aren’t close enough to necessitate staring upwards for the whole show, but they’re immersive and detailed.

Best legroom seats

Anyone wanting a bit of extra legroom should choose an aisle seat. Although views are good from almost everywhere, the aisles at either side of the Center Orchestra guarantee a head-on view.

Tips

• The Mezzanine overhang begins at row J and is obvious by row O
• The rake between rows is quite shallow in the back half of the Orchestra
• The best seats are Center Orchestra, rows A to D
• Good value seats are available in rows E to J

Pricing

The Orchestra is the most expensive overall area in the Cort Theatre, with premium seats close to the stage. Prices gradually become cheaper in the back rows and to the side of the Left and Right Orchestras, with the cheapest seats in the far corners.

Bars

The theater bar is in the lobby, serving alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks and refreshments. Set a budget before you go, as drinks can be pricey.

Toilets

Restrooms are down one flight of stairs (19 steps) below the Orchestra. These serve the whole theater so will get busy during the intermission. On-site restrooms are not accessible, although patrons can use wheelchair accessible restrooms at the Renaissance Hotel on West 48th Street and 7th Avenue.