Samuel J. Friedman Theatre Orchestra

Orchestra photos

View Seating Plan

Orchestra guide

The Samuel J. Friedman Theatre Orchestra is slightly larger than the Mezzanine above, with around 442 seats divided into just two sections. Unlike many Broadway venues, this Orchestra comprises a Left Orchestra and a Right Orchestra divided by a center aisle; there is no Center Orchestra or Boxes.

The Orchestra has a number of positives, including comfort and legroom, as well as very impressive sightlines all round. Whilst the front rows might feel a touch too close for some patrons, the best premium seats are towards the inside of rows A to D.

Whilst the section has its share of less desirable seats - including those at the far sides which offer more angled views of the stage – there are no truly bad spots in the auditorium. A good rake at the rear and well-regulated acoustics throughout mean even the back rows offer a surprisingly comprehensive look at the stage.

Accessible seating, including wheelchair spaces, are spread across both sides of the Orchestra, and are mainly in the back half of the section.

Left Orchestra

The Left Orchestra comprises 18 curved rows from AA to Q, with odd-numbered seating in the range of 101 to 129 in the longest middle rows. Row length varies, with the front row having just three seats and the back two rows 10 seats. The best sightlines are from the inside of rows A to D, which offer detailed but not uncomfortably close positions. Seats further towards the outside aisle offer a more angled look at the stage and beyond row O legroom can get slightly tighter. However, views are largely impressive across the board in this section, with a slight rake keeping rows gently elevated above those in front. Premium seats are those close to the center aisle in the front rows; prices are lower at the rear.

Right Orchestra

The Right Orchestra numbers 18 rows from AA to Q, with even-numbered seating starting at 102 and reaching 130 in the longest middle rows. Like the Left Orchestra, row length varies, with the front row having just three seats and the back two rows 10 seats. Views are best from central seats in rows A to D, as the front rows are a little close to the stage and seats further along become slightly angled. However, the effect of either is minor and sightlines in the Right Orchestra are very good from front to back, aided by a good rake with comfortable legroom. Premium seats are those close to the center aisle, in the front rows; prices are lower at the rear.

SeatPlan’s best views of the stage

Seats towards the inside of rows A to D in either sections are excellent – not too close to call for sustained neck craning, but still intimate enough to pick up facial expressions and subtle acting.

Best legroom seats

Legroom in the Orchestra is very good, and certainly better than average for a Broadway venue. If you want to make sure you have enough space, opt for an aisle seat.

Tips

• The Mezzanine overhangs Orchestra row G
• The best views are from the inside of rows A to D
• Legroom across the section is much better than average
• The front rows may feel a little too close to the stage
• Good value seats are across rows E to J

Pricing

The Orchestra is the more expensive overall seating area in the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, with the premium front rows costing the most. After row E, prices drop somewhat, with the cheapest options at the rear of the section.

Bars

The closest bar is in the Susan and Peter J. Solomon Family Lounge, down one flight of stairs – or via the elevator - from the Orchestra. Drinks are served up to 45 minutes before performance times.

Toilets

Restrooms, including a wheelchair accessible option, are located in the Susan and Peter J. Solomon Family Lounge, one level below the Orchestra.