Stephen Sondheim Theatre Mezzanine

Mezzanine photos

View Seating Plan

Mezzanine guide

The Mezzanine is an elevated section above the Orchestra, with around 328 seats divided by stepped aisles into Left, Right and Center. It is generally cheaper than the Orchestra, with some good value seats in the back half.

This is a very small and compact section, with good sightlines throughout. The best views are in the front rows, where the stage feels very close, although a good rake means patrons sitting right at the back of the theater can also get a clean view down to the stage. There are very few obstructions, although as always sitting more centrally is better for an overall look at the stage and set pieces.

The main downside to the Mezzanine is space. Many theatergoers will find that legroom is at a premium, with aisle seats very popular amongst taller patrons or anyone who wants to stretch out a little.

The Stephen Sondheim Theatre Mezzanine is located above the Orchestra, although an elevator serving the level means it is accessible to all patrons. There are both wheelchair and transfer seats available in the section.

Left Mezzanine

The Left Mezzanine comprises nine rows from AA to JJ, with odd-numbered seats escalating from 1 to 19 at most. Views are best from the inside of the Left Mezzanine, which has clean and more central sightlines down to the stage. Double-digit seats further out rest at an angle, with parts of stage right (your left) out of view. Sightlines are mainly good from front to back however, with a good rake to avoid patrons' heads getting in the way of those sitting behind. Pitch between seats can be very cramped, so taller patrons should choose an aisle seat to avoid discomfort. Prices in the Left Mezzanine are highest in the front rows, with good value options a little further back.

Right Mezzanine

The Right Mezzanine has nine rows from AA to JJ, with even-numbered seats numbering 2 to 20 at most. Single-digit seats on the inside of rows AA and BB offer the best views in the section, whilst seats closer to the far aisle are more angled. However, this small section has very good views throughout, with a decent rake elevating each row to avoid obstructions. The best options for extra legroom are on the inside aisle, as space between rows is rather limited. Prices across the Right Mezzanine are more expensive at the front, with good value options in the back rows.

Center Mezzanine

The Center Mezzanine has nine rows from AA to JJ, with seats escalating from 101 to 121, right to left. Rows AA and BB are premium in both view and price, with direct, sweeping overhead views of the stage. However, from every seat in the section, patrons can enjoy clean sightlines. This is mainly helped by the rake, which is ideal for avoiding restrictions in the back half. Good value seats are available in rows GG to JJ, therefore. Taller patrons should opt for an aisle seat for more comfort and space, with either side a good choice in the Center Mezzanine.

SeatPlan’s best views of the stage

Rows AA and BB in the Center Mezzanine are considered premium seats for the entire theater, with excellently detailed yet comprehensive overviews of the stage. Many theatergoers consider these the best seats from which to enjoy the full scale of a performance.

Best legroom seats

Legroom can get very cramped in the Stephen Sondheim Theatre Mezzanine, with the best choices for extra space on the aisles.

Tips

• The best views are from the premium Center Mezzanine rows AA and BB
• The whole section is well-raked for clean sightlines throughout
• Good value seats are available in the back rows
• The Mezzanine is served by an elevator for easy access

Pricing

The Mezzanine is generally cheaper than the Orchestra, although premium seats in the Center Mezzanine can be pricey. The back rows in particular offer good value deals for anyone wanting to save a bit of money on Broadway.

Bars

The Stephen Sondheim Theatre bar is on the Orchestra level, selling a range of drinks and snacks.

Toilets

There are restrooms on this level of the theater, meaning it’s just a quick walk to beat the queues. Other restrooms are two floors down in the lower lobby.