St James Theatre Orchestra

Orchestra photos

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Orchestra guide

The Orchestra is the largest section of the St. James Theatre, lying close to the stage with 705 seats across up to 20 rows. The Center Orchestra is flanked by the Left and Right Orchestra, with aisles running between each.

The Mezzanine overhang begins at row J, meaning seats behind this may experience cut-off at the top of the stage. The best legroom in the Orchestra will usually be found on aisle seats, although the comfort of extra space may be offset by a side-on restricted view for some productions if the seat is further along than the middle of Left or Right Orchestra. Views are best in the Center Orchestra’s first ten rows.

Patrons should watch out for reduced price tickets in row A which can be obstructed by the conductor’s box in front. Prices in the rest of the Orchestra follow a more traditional pattern, with the most expensive seats found in the front of the Center Orchestra, and the cheapest at the back and sides of the Left and Right sections. Good value seats in St. James Theatre can be found near the back of the Center Orchestra.

Patrons using wheelchairs can find designated step-free seating for themselves and companions in the center-to-back half of the Orchestra, and transfer seats are similarly found - also step-free - across rows C-P.

Left Orchestra

The Left Orchestra curves towards the stage with odd-numbered seating ranging from 1 on the inside up to 29 on the outer aisle. The section extends back 17 rows, starting with BB and ending with Q. Legroom is better on the aisles, and patrons should opt for inside seats such as D1 if possible.

Some seats in this section will be marked as partial view because their angle to the stage means the left-hand side is somewhat restricted. Seats affected by this include J25, and any seats close to the far aisle. The Mezzanine overhang can also disrupt sightlines, especially after rows M and N where the top of the stage is more noticeably cut off. However, seats at this distance still have fair views and do not feel far away from the action. Tickets are most expensive in the front rows, towards the inside. Prices gradually lower towards the back and far sides.

Right Orchestra

The Right Orchestra runs even-numbered from 2 to 30 at its widest points, with 17 rows of seats. Like the Left Orchestra, views of the side of the stage become gradually more restricted the further out you sit, with seats on the far side aisle being most affected. Whilst these have better legroom than mid-aisle seats, patrons needing more space should initially try and get an inside aisle seat for a better overall view.

The Mezzanine overhang at row J really starts to show a few rows further back, with the top part of the stage cut off from around row M. This shouldn’t affect the rest of the stage, however. Prices are most expensive at the front, although some theatergoers might prefer to sit a little further back where it is cheaper, and they are less likely to be looking up at the stage so much.

Center Orchestra

The Center Orchestra provides some of the best views in St. James Theatre and is perfect for patrons who want a head-on, close-up experience. Seats escalate from 101 on the right to 115 on the left. The front row, BB, is divided in the middle by the conductor’s box, and seats directly behind in row A are priced lower to compensate for the obstructed view.

The premium seats in the Center Orchestra are in the front rows, with most seats between rows A and M affording excellent sightlines to the stage. Further back, the Mezzanine overhang can become more obvious, cutting off the very top of the stage; the rake is also not steep enough to compensate for taller patrons in front. The back three rows, R-T, are notably cheaper than the front due to this. However, views are overall very good in the Center Orchestra.

SeatPlan’s best views of the stage

Seats in the front half of the Center Orchestra, namely in rows A-M, offer some of the best views in the St. James Theatre. Some patrons may prefer sitting a bit further back to avoid looking up at the stage for a prolonged period.

Best legroom seats

Row A and the aisles both offer extra legroom; depending on patrons’ preference, either can be a good choice to enjoy the show in comfort.

Tips

• Seats A106-109 are partial view thanks to the conductor’s box directly in front
• Seats in higher range of numbers can be notably partial view, with sides of the stage cut off
• The Mezzanine overhang is more obvious after row M
• The stage is quite high so patrons may want to sit a couple of rows back
• The best seats are in the Center Orchestra, rows A-M

Pricing

Seats A106-109 are significantly cheaper than the premium seats either side to allow for the conductor’s box in front. The pricing of the Orchestra tends to spread out to the back and sides, with the most expensive seating in the first rows of the Center Orchestra. The cheapest seats for the section are the back halves of the Left and Right Orchestra, and the final three rows of the Center Orchestra.

Bars

A bar selling snacks, alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks is located on the Orchestra level, although prices can add up. Patrons are welcome to take their refreshments back to their seats.

Toilets

Restrooms are one flight of stairs (22 steps) below the Orchestra, with other options up 29 steps in the Mezzanine. A wheelchair accessible unisex restroom is located step-free on the main level of the theater.