Walter Kerr Theatre Orchestra

Orchestra photos

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Orchestra guide

The Orchestra is the largest area of the theater, with seats spread across three sections. The Center Orchestra is flanked by the Left and Right Orchestra, with aisles running between. To the sides of the section, Left and Right Boxes provide more private seating. Pricing in the Orchestra is at its most expensive in the Center front rows, with the cheapest options towards the back edges of the Left and Right sections.

Spaces in the front few rows of the Center Orchestra are arguably the best seats in the house, allowing intimate and unobstructed views of the stage. Guests sitting to the far sides of the Left and Right Orchestra and the back may find their views of actors’ entrances and exits more restricted, but the section benefits from a good rake to avoid patrons in front blocking their sightlines. The Mezzanine overhang starts relatively far forward at row H, so sitting behind this could mean the top of the stage is cut off.

Patrons can find wheelchair and transfer seating in the back half of the Orchestra, with all wheelchair designated spaces step-free.

Left Orchestra

The Left Orchestra is set out across 15 rows running C-S, with seats escalating odd-numbered from 1 inside to as high as 21 on the far aisle. Rows are shortest in the front half, with eight seats across, and become longer towards the back. The section has a decent rake to avoid too much restriction from guests in the rows ahead.

Rows curve towards the stage to reduce restricted views, although seats at the far sides will still be at more of an angle than those closer to the Center Orchestra. Patrons looking for extra legroom should at first look along the inside aisle at seats such as C1-G1. Seats in the back half and in the higher range of numbers may be markedly cheaper than those close to the inside aisle to reflect the difference in view.

Eight seats are available in Box seating slightly above and to the side of the Left Orchestra, although they may feel too sidelong for some guests.

Right Orchestra

The Right Orchestra also has 15 rows of seats which run even-numbered from 2 to 22 at their longest. Every row curves towards the stage which improves the angled view, although patrons will still find that seats at the higher range such as G22 or P18 have a more restricted view than those further in; prices in the section sometimes get gradually cheaper towards the end of rows as a reflection of this. The Orchestra has quite tight seating, so taller patrons should look to the aisle seats for a bit more legroom. The most expensive seats in the Right Orchestra are along the front rows where views are perfect for enjoying actors in an intimate drama. Sitting a few rows back is also a good option for those who don’t like to be too close.

Box seating to the side of the Right Orchestra offers a very close view of the stage at an angle.

Center Orchestra

The Center Orchestra boasts some of the best, and most expensive, seats in the Walter Kerr Theatre. The section’s 15 rows start with C at the front down to S at the back of the auditorium. Each row is on average 18 seats across, starting at 101 on the right-hand side and ending at 118 on the left. Like the Left and Right Orchestra, better-than-average legroom is available on aisle seats, although in this section both aisles have a similar, fairly head-on view of the stage. Patrons wanting unparalleled central seats should opt for rows C and D. These are the most expensive rows in the theater, and don’t sit too far below the stage – an excellent option for this venue’s program of plays over musicals. Other patrons may prefer to sit slightly further back in rows E-L, which also have very good views of performances at a slightly cheaper price.

SeatPlan’s best views of the stage

The Walter Kerr Theatre usually houses plays instead of musicals so sitting near the front is advantageous for admiring subtle acting. Center Orchestra rows C and D (the front rows) aren’t too far below the stage and are perfect for feeling immersed in the drama. Rows E-L also offer impressively clear sightlines.

Best legroom seats

The Center Orchestra aisle seats and those on the inside of the Left and Right Orchestra are ideal for remaining close to stage whilst gaining extra legroom.

Tips

• Mezzanine overhang starts at row H
• For more legroom, choose inside aisle seats first
• The front rows aren’t too far below the stage, making them great options for intimate plays
• The Boxes can feel very side-on to the stage
• Step-free wheelchair and transfer seats are available across the Orchestra

Pricing

The Walter Kerr Theatre Orchestra is the most expensive area of seating, with premium tickets in the Center Orchestra’s front few rows. Seats at the far sides, back rows and corners are cheaper than the rest of the section due to their comparatively more restricted views. Some wheelchair seating may also be offered at a lower price.

Bars

A bar selling alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and snacks is located at the back of the Orchestra, with another bar available at the back of the Mezzanine, 37 steps up.

Toilets

Restrooms can be reached on either side of the Orchestra, up one flight of stairs. The women’s restroom is up 19 steps whilst the men’s is up 18 steps. These are the only restrooms in the theater, with the exception of a wheelchair accessible one on Orchestra level; queues can get long during the intermission.