August Wilson Theatre Orchestra

Orchestra photos

View Seating Plan

Orchestra guide

The Orchestra is the largest area of seating in the August Wilson Theatre, with three sections totaling around 700 seats and up to 26 rows. The Center Orchestra is flanked by the Left and Right Orchestra, with aisles running in between.

Views are best in the Center Orchestra, where seats face directly forward. The ideal positions for clear, detailed and unobstructed views are in rows D-G. Rows A-C may be too close for comfort and require neck craning to look up at actors. On the other hand, sitting too far back in rows U-ZZ may mean sightlines are obstructed by taller patrons.

The Mezzanine overhang begins at row L, and in rows V-ZZ will cut off the top of the stage; several of the seats in these rows are sometimes marked partial view. The Left and Right Orchestra rows aren’t very long, but sitting at the far side will still create an angled view of the stage. These seats are usually cheaper than the premium Center Orchestra options.

Patrons with limited mobility or wheelchairs will find designated seating for themselves and companions in the Left Orchestra, which is closest to the stair lift and accessible restroom.

Left Orchestra

Left Orchestra seats are odd-numbered from 1 to 17 across 26 rows (A-ZZ). Views are best from single-digit seats on the inside, and the stage becomes more angled near the far side. This can feel worse in the front three rows because of their proximity to the action; the stage itself may also restrict views from row A. Beyond row U shorter theatergoers may find it harder to see above other patrons’ heads, and the Mezzanine overhang is more obvious. Rows W-ZZ are often marked partial view to reflect this. Legroom in the Left Orchestra is best in the front row and on either aisle. Patrons can expect to pay more for seats towards the inside and front of the Left Orchestra, with prices lowering towards the far side and back.

Right Orchestra

The Right Orchestra has 26 rows from A-ZZ, with seats running evenly from right to left between 2 and 18. Seats closer to the inside aisle face more directly towards the stage, although rows A-C may be too close for some patrons; views of action further back might be hard to see from here. Legroom is better on the aisles, with clearer and less angled sightlines on the inside aisle. Although the Right Orchestra is more raked towards the back, it can be hard to see clearly over people’s heads in rows V-ZZ. The Mezzanine overhang also cuts off the top of the stage in these rows, and may be marked partial view on the ticket. Seats cost more in the front rows, and become cheaper towards the back and right-hand aisle.

Center Orchestra

The Center Orchestra covers 25 rows starting with A and ending either side of the sound booth with Z. Seats number 101-114 right to left (or 101-118 in the back rows) and both aisles are ideal for extra legroom. The clearest sightlines are in rows D-G, which are neither too close to comfortably appreciate the full set nor too far to see details. In the back half, the rake kicks in to give more lift between rows, although patrons will still find obstructed views in rows U-Z. The Mezzanine overhang is also evident after row V, where it covers the top of the stage. The most expensive seats in the Center Orchestra are in the front, and patrons will find tickets cost a bit less towards the rear.

SeatPlan’s best views of the stage

Sitting in rows D-G of the Center Orchestra is ideal. From these seats, patrons won’t feel like they’re missing out on any detail, and will be sitting far enough from the stage to avoid looking up for the whole performance.

Best legroom seats

Patrons should try and get seats next to an aisle to make the most of legroom, as rows in the August Wilson Theatre can be quite tight. An inside aisle is the preferable option for a more direct view of the stage.

Tips

• The best views are from the Center Orchestra, rows D-G
• All accessible seats are in the Left Orchestra, close to the stair lift
• Row A may be too close to take in the performance comfortably
• The Mezzanine overhang starts at row L and cuts into the top of the stage around row V
• The sound may be less clear under the Mezzanine

Pricing

The August Wilson Theatre Orchestra is the most expensive section in the venue, with prices at their highest in the front half of the Center Orchestra. The very front row, A, is sometimes cheaper because of its proximity to the stage. Patrons will find seats cost a bit less at the far sides and back rows, where sightlines are less comprehensive.

Bars

Patrons in the Orchestra can buy drinks and snacks from bars in the main lobby (25 steps down) or Mezzanine lobby (16 steps up). Refreshments can be taken back to the seating area.

Toilets

The closest restrooms are in the Lower Lobby, down one flight of stairs below the Orchestra. A wheelchair accessible restroom is on the left side of the Orchestra, close to the stair lift.